1.1 Children’s rights and entitlements

Policy statement

  • We promote children’s right to be strong, resilient and listened to by creating an environment in our setting that encourages children to develop a positive self-image, which includes their heritage arising from their colour and ethnicity, their languages spoken at home, their religious beliefs, cultural traditions and home background.
  • We promote children’s right to be strong, resilient and listened to by encouraging children to develop a sense of autonomy and independence.
  • We promote children’s right to be strong, resilient and listened to by enabling children to have the self-confidence and the vocabulary to resist inappropriate approaches.
  • We help children to establish and sustain satisfying relationships within their families, with peers, and with other adults.
  • We work with parents to build their understanding of, and commitment to, the principles of safeguarding all our children.

 

What it means to promote children’s rights and entitlements to be ‘strong, resilient and listened to’.

To be strong means to be:

  • secure in their foremost attachment relationships, where they are loved and cared for by at least one person who is able to offer consistent, positive and unconditional regard and who can be relied on;
  • safe and valued as individuals in their families and in relationships beyond the family, such as day care or school;
  • self-assured and form a positive sense of themselves – including all aspects of their identity and heritage;
  • included equally and belong in oursetting and in community life;
  • confident in their own abilities and proud of their achievements;
  • progressing optimally in all aspects of their development and learning;
  • part of a peer group in which they learn to negotiate, develop social skills and an identity as global citizens, respecting the rights of others in a diverse world; and
  • able to represent themselves and participate in aspects of service delivery that affects them, as well as aspects of key decisions that affect their lives.

To be resilient means to:

  • be sure of their self-worth and dignity;
  • be able to be assertive and state their needs effectively;
  • be able to overcome difficulties and problems;
  • be positive in their outlook on life;
  • be able to cope with challenge and change;
  • have a sense of justice towards themselves and others;
  • develop a sense of responsibility towards themselves and others; and
  • be able to represent themselves and others in key decision making processes.

To be listened to means:

  • adults who are close to children recognise their need and right to express and communicate their thoughts, feelings and ideas;
  • adults who are close to children are able to tune in to their verbal, sign and body language in order to understand and interpret what is being expressed and communicated;
  • adults who are close to children are able to respond appropriately and, when required, act upon their understanding of what children express and communicate; and
  • adults respect children’s rights and facilitate children’s participation and representation in imaginative and child centred ways in all aspects of core services.

 

1.2 Safeguarding children, young people and vulnerable adults

Policy statement

Our setting will work with children, parents and the community to ensure the rights and safety of children, young people* and vulnerable adults. Our Safeguarding Policy is based on the three key commitments of the Pre-school Learning Alliance Safeguarding Children Policy.

Procedures

 We carry out the following procedures to ensure We meet the three key commitments of the Alliance Safeguarding Children Policy, which incorporates responding to child protection concerns.

Key commitment 1

We are committed to building a ‘culture of safety’ in which children, young people and vulnerable adults are protected from abuse and harm in all areas of our service delivery.

Our designated person who co-ordinates child protection issues is:  

Burton Crescent – Clare Bligh – Charity Manager

Wood Lane – Ellen McCartney – Site Manager 

  • When the setting is open but the designated person is not on site, a suitably trained deputy is available at all times for staff to discuss safeguarding concerns. (Sharon Hargreves/ Emily Haskins – Burton Crescent. Michele Cobb/ Shehnaz Shah- Wood Lane)
  • The designated person, the suitably trained deputy and the designated officer ensure they have relevant links with statutory and voluntary organisations with regard to safeguarding.
  • The designated person (and the person who deputises for them) understands LSCB safeguarding procedures, attends relevant LSCB training at least every two years and refreshes their knowledge of safeguarding at least annually.
  • We ensure all staff are trained to understand our safeguarding policies and procedures and that parents are made aware of them too.
  • All staff have an up-to-date knowledge of safeguarding issues, are alert to potential indicators and signs of abuse and neglect and understand their professional duty to ensure safeguarding and child protection concerns are reported to the local authority children’s social care team or the NSPCC. They receive updates on safeguarding at least annually.
  • All staff are confident to ask questions in relation to any safeguarding concerns and know not to just take things at face value but can be respectfully sceptical.
  • All staff understand the principles of early help (as defined in Working Together to Safeguard Children, 2018) and are able to identify those children and families who may be in need of early help and enable them to access it.
  • All staff understand LSCB thresholds of significant harm and understand how to access services for families, including for those families who are below the threshold for significant harm.
  • All staff understand how to escalate their concerns in the event that they feel either the local authority and/or their own organisation has not acted adequately to safeguard.
  • All staff understand what the organisation expects of them in terms of their required behaviour and conduct, and follow our policies and procedures on positive behaviour, online safety (including use of mobile phones), whistleblowing and dignity at work.
  • Children have a key person to build a relationship with, and are supported to articulate any worries, concerns or complaints that they may have in an age appropriate way.
  • All staff understand our policy on promoting positive behaviour and follow it in relation to children showing aggression towards other children.
  • Adequate and appropriate staffing resources are provided to meet the needs of children.
  • Applicants for posts within the setting are clearly informed that the positions are exempt from the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974.
  • Enhanced criminal records and barred lists checks and other suitability checks are carried out for staff and volunteers prior to their post being confirmed, to ensure that no disqualified person or unsuitable person works at the setting or has access to the children.
  • Where applications are rejected based on information disclosed, applicants have the right to know and to challenge incorrect information.
  • Enhanced criminal records and barred lists checks are carried out on anyone living or working on the premises.
  • Volunteers must:

–         be aged 17 or over; or on school placement

–         be considered competent and responsible;

–         receive a robust induction and regular supervisory meetings;

–         be familiar with all the settings policies and procedures;

–         be fully checked for suitability if they are to have unsupervised access to the children at any time.

  • Information is recorded about staff qualifications, and the identity checks and vetting processes that have been completed including:

–         the criminal records disclosure reference number;

–         the date the disclosure was obtained; and

–         details of who obtained it.

  • All staff and volunteers are informed that they are expected to disclose any convictions, cautions, court orders or reprimands and warnings which may affect their suitability to work with children (whether received before or during their employment with us).
  • All staff and volunteers are required to notify us if anyone in their household (including family members, lodgers, partners etc.) has any relevant convictions, cautions, court orders, reprimands or warnings or has been barred from, or had registration refused or cancelled in relation to any childcare provision or have had orders made in relation to care of their children.
  • We notify the Disclosure and Barring Service of any person who is dismissed from our employment, or resigns in circumstances that would otherwise have led to dismissal for reasons of a child protection concern.
  • Procedures are in place to record the details of visitors to the setting.
  • Security steps are taken to ensure that We have control over who comes into the setting so that no unauthorised person has unsupervised access to the children.
  • Steps are taken to ensure children are not photographed or filmed on video for any other purpose than to record their development or their participation in events organised by us. Parents sign a consent form and have access to records holding visual images of their child.
  • Any personal information is held securely and in line with the GDPR data protection requirements and guidance .
  • The designated person in the setting has responsibility for ensuring that there is an adequate online safety policy in place.
  • We keep a written record of all complaints and concerns including details of how they were responded to.
  • We ensure that robust risk assessments are completed, that they are seen and signed by all relevant staff and that they are regularly reviewed and updated, in line with our health and safety policy.
  • The designated officer will support the designated person to undertake their role adequately and offer advice, guidance, supervision and support.
  • The designated person will inform the designated officer at the first opportunity of every significant safeguarding concern, however this should not delay any referrals being made to children’s social care, the LADO, Ofsted or Riddor.

 

Key commitment 2

We are committed to responding promptly and appropriately to all incidents, allegations or concerns of abuse that may occur and to work with statutory agencies in accordance with the procedures that are set down in ‘What to do if you’re worried a child is being abused’ (HMG, 2015)

 

Responding to suspicions of abuse

  • We acknowledge that abuse of children can take different forms – physical, emotional, and sexual, as well as neglect.
  • We ensure that all staff have an understanding of the additional vulnerabilities that arise from special educational needs and/or disabilities, plus inequalities of race, gender, language, religion, sexual orientation or culture, and that these receive full consideration in relation to child, young person or vulnerable adult protection.
  • When children are suffering from physical, sexual or emotional abuse, or experiencing neglect, this may be demonstrated through:

–       significant changes in their behaviour;

–       deterioration in their general well-being;

–       their comments which may give cause for concern, or the things they say (direct or indirect disclosure);

–       changes in their appearance, their behaviour, or their play;

–       unexplained bruising, marks or signs of possible abuse or neglect; and

–       any reason to suspect neglect or abuse outside the setting.

  • We are aware of the ‘hidden harm’ agenda concerning parents with drug and alcohol problems and consider other factors affecting parental capacity and risk, such as social exclusion, domestic violence, radicalisation, mental or physical illness and parent’s learning disability.
  • We are aware that children’s vulnerability is potentially increased when they are privately fostered and when we know that a child is being cared for under a private fostering arrangement, we inform our local authority children’s social care team.
  • We are aware of other factors that affect children’s vulnerability that may affect, or may have affected, children and young people using our provision, such as abuse of children who have special educational needs and/or disabilities; fabricated or induced illness; child abuse linked to beliefs in spirit possession; sexual exploitation of children, including through internet abuse; Female Genital Mutilation and radicalisation or extremism.
  • In relation to radicalisation and extremism, We follow the Prevent Duty guidance for England and Wales published by the Home Office and LSCB procedures on responding to radicalisation.
  • The designated person completes online Channel training, online Prevent training and attends local WRAP training where available to ensure they are familiar with the local protocol and procedures for responding to concerns about radicalisation.
  • We are aware of the mandatory duty that applies to teachers and health workers to report cases of Female Genital Mutilation to the police.
  • We also make ourselves aware that some children and young people are affected by gang activity, by complex, multiple or organised abuse, through forced marriage or honour based violence or may be victims of child trafficking. While this may be less likely to affect young children in our care, We may become aware of any of these factors affecting older children and young people who We may come into contact with.
  • Where We believe that a child in our care or that is known to us may be affected by any of these factors We follow the procedures below for reporting child protection concerns and follow the LSCB procedures.
  • Where such evidence is apparent, the child’s key person makes a dated record of the details of the concern and discusses what to do with the member of staff who is acting as the designated person. The information is stored on the child’s personal file.
  • In the event that a staff member or volunteer is unhappy with the decision made of the designated person in relation to whether to make a safeguarding referral they must follow escalation procedures.
  • We refer concerns to the local authority children’s social care team and co-operate fully in any subsequent investigation. NB In some cases this may mean the police or another agency identified by the Local Safeguarding Children Board.
  • We take care not to influence the outcome either through the way We speak to children or by asking questions of children.
  • We take account of the need to protect young people aged 16-19 as defined by the Children Act 1989. This may include students or school children on work placement, young employees or young parents. Where abuse is suspected We follow the procedure for reporting any other child protection concerns. The views of the young person will always be taken into account, but the setting may override the young person’s refusal to consent to share information if it feels that it is necessary to prevent a crime from being committed or intervene where one may have been, or to prevent harm to a child or adult. Sharing confidential information without consent is done only where not sharing it could be worse than the outcome of having shared it.
  • We have a whistleblowing policy in place.
  • Staff/volunteers know they can contact the organisation Public Concern at Work for advice relating to whistleblowing; if they feel that the organisation has not acted adequately in relation to safeguarding they can contact the NSPCC whistleblowing helpline.

 

Recording suspicions of abuse and disclosures

  • Where a child makes comments to a member of staff that give cause for concern (disclosure), or a member of staff observes signs or signals that give cause for concern, such as significant changes in behaviour; deterioration in general well-being; unexplained bruising, marks or signs of possible abuse or neglect; that member of staff:

–       listens to the child, offers reassurance and gives assurance that she or he will take action;

–       does not question the child, although it is OK to ask questions for the purposes of clarification;

–       makes a written record that forms an objective record of the observation or disclosure that includes: the date and time of the observation or the disclosure; the exact words spoken by the child as far as possible; the name of the person to whom the concern was reported, with the date and time; and the names of any other person present at the time.

  • These records are signed and dated and kept in the child’s personal file, which is kept securely and confidentially.
  • The member of staff acting as the designated person is informed of the issue at the earliest opportunity, and within one working day.
  • Where the Local Safeguarding Children Board stipulates the process for recording and sharing concerns, We include those procedures alongside this procedure and follow the steps set down by the Local Safeguarding Children Board.

 

Making a referral to the local authority children’s social care team

  • The Pre-school Learning Alliance’s publication Safeguarding Children contains procedures for making a referral to the local children’s social care team, as well as a template form for recording concerns and making a referral.
  • We keep a copy of this document alongside the procedures for recording and reporting set down by our Local Safeguarding Children Board, which We follow where local procedures differ from those of the Pre-school Learning Alliance.

Escalation process

  • If I feel that a referral made has not been dealt with properly or that concerns are not being addressed or responded to, we will follow the LSCB escalation process.
  • We will ensure that staff are aware of how to escalate concerns.

Informing parents

  • Parents are normally the first point of contact. Concerns are discussed with parents to gain their view of events, unless it is felt that this may put the child at risk, or interfere with the course of a police investigation. Advice will be sought from social care if necessary.
  • Parents are informed when We make a record of concerns in their child’s file and that We also make a note of any discussion We have with them regarding a concern.
  • If a suspicion of abuse warrants referral to social care, parents are informed at the same time that the referral will be made, except where the guidance of the Local Safeguarding Children Board does not allow this, for example, where it is believed that the child may be placed at risk.
  • This will usually be the case where the parent is the likely abuser.
  • If there is a possibility that advising a parent beforehand may place a child at greater risk (or interfere with a police response) the designated person should seek advice from children’s social care, about whether or not to advise parents beforehand, and should record and follow the advice given.

Liaison with other agencies

  • We work within the Local Safeguarding Children Board guidelines.
  • The current version of ‘What to do if you’re worried a child is being abused’ is available for parents and staff and all staff are familiar with what they need to do if they have concerns.
  • We have procedures for contacting the local authority regarding child protection issues, including maintaining a list of names, addresses and telephone numbers of social workers, to ensure that it is easy, in any emergency, for the setting and children’s social care to work well together.
  • We notify Ofsted of any incident or accident and any changes in our arrangements which may affect the well-being of children or where an allegation of abuse is made against a member of staff (whether the allegations relate to harm or abuse committed on our premises or elsewhere). Notifications to Ofsted are made as soon as is reasonably practicable, but at the latest within 14 days of the allegations being made.
  • Contact details for the local National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC) are also kept.

Allegations against staff

  • We ensure that all parents know how to complain about the behaviour or actions of staff or volunteers within the setting, or anyone living or working on the premises occupied by the setting, which may include an allegation of abuse.
  • We respond to any inappropriate behaviour displayed by members of staff, volunteer or any other person living or working on the premises, which includes:

–       inappropriate sexual comments;

–       excessive one-to-one attention beyond the requirements of their usual role and responsibilities, or inappropriate sharing of images.

  • We follow the guidance of the Local Safeguarding Children Board when responding to any complaint that a member of staff or volunteer within the setting, or anyone living or working on the premises occupied by the setting, has abused a child.
  • We ensure that all staff and volunteers know how to raise concerns about a member of staff or volunteer within the setting. We respond to any concerns raised by staff and volunteers who know how to escalate their concerns if they are not satisfied with [our/my] response
  • We respond to any disclosure by children or staff that abuse by a member of staff or volunteer within the setting, or anyone living or working on the premises occupied by the setting, may have taken, or is taking place, by first recording the details of any such alleged incident.
  • We refer any such complaint immediately to the Local Authority Designated Officer (LADO) to investigate and/or offer advice:
Ted O’sulivan  01132478652  
  • We also report any such alleged incident to Ofsted (unless advised by LADO that this is unnecessary due to the incident not meeting the threshold), as well as what measures We have taken. We are aware that it is an offence not to do this.
  • We co-operate entirely with any investigation carried out by children’s social care in conjunction with the police.
  • Where the management team and children’s social care agree it is appropriate in the circumstances, the member of staff or volunteer will be suspended for the duration of the investigation. This is not an indication of admission that the alleged incident has taken place, but is to protect the staff, as well as children and families, throughout the process.

Disciplinary action

Where a member of staff or volunteer has been dismissed due to engaging in activities that caused concern for the safeguarding of children or vulnerable adults, We will notify the Disclosure and Barring Service of relevant information, so that individuals who pose a threat to children and vulnerable groups can be identified and barred from working with these groups.

Key commitment 3

We are committed to promoting awareness of child abuse issues throughout our training and learning programmes for adults. We are also committed to empowering children through our early childhood curriculum, promoting their right to be strong, resilient and listened to.

Training

  • Training opportunities are sought for all adults involved in the setting to ensure that they are able to recognise the signs and signals of possible physical abuse, emotional abuse, sexual abuse (including child sexual exploitation) and neglect and that they are aware of the local authority guidelines for making referrals.
  • Designated Persons receive appropriate training, as recommended by the Local Safeguarding Children Board, every two years and refresh their knowledge and skills at least annually.
  • We ensure that all staff know the procedures for reporting and recording any concerns they may have about the provision.
  • We ensure that all staff receive updates on safeguarding via emails, newsletters, online training and/or discussion at staff meetings at least once a year.

Planning

  • The layout of the rooms allows for constant supervision.  No child is left alone with staff or volunteers in a one-to-one situation without being within sight and/or hearing of other staff or volunteers.

Curriculum

  • We introduce key elements of keeping children safe into our programme to promote the personal, social and emotional development of all children, so that they may grow to be strong, resilient and listened to and so that they develop an understanding of why and how to keep safe.
  • We create within the setting a culture of value and respect for individuals, having positive regard for children’s heritage arising from their colour, ethnicity, languages spoken at home, cultural and social background.
  • We ensure that this is carried out in a way that is developmentally appropriate for the children.

Confidentiality

  • All suspicions and investigations are kept confidential and shared only with those who need to know. Any information is shared under the guidance of the Local Safeguarding Children Board.

Support to families

  • We believe in building trusting and supportive relationships with families, staff and volunteers.
  • We make clear to parents our role and responsibilities in relation to child protection, such as for the reporting of concerns, information sharing, monitoring of the child, and liaising at all times with the local children’s social care team.
  • We will continue to welcome the child and the family whilst investigations are being made in relation to any alleged abuse.
  • We follow the Child Protection Plan as set by the child’s social worker in relation to the setting’s designated role and tasks in supporting that child and their family, subsequent to any investigation.
  • Confidential records kept on a child are shared with the child’s parents or those who have parental responsibility for the child in accordance with the Confidentiality and Client Access to Records procedure, and only if appropriate under the guidance of the Local Safeguarding Children Board.

 

1.3 Looked after children 

Policy statement

Headingley Preschool is committed to providing quality provision based on equality of opportunity for all children and their families. All staff in our provision are committed to doing all they can to enable ‘looked after’ children in our care to achieve and reach their full potential.

Children become ‘looked after’ if they have either been taken into care by the local authority, or have been accommodated by the local authority (a voluntary care arrangement). Most looked after children will be living in foster homes, but a smaller number may be in a children’s home, living with a relative or even placed back home with their natural parent(s).

We recognise that children who are being looked after have often experienced traumatic situations; physical, emotional or sexual abuse or neglect. However, we also recognise that not all looked after children have experienced abuse and that there are a range of reasons for children to be taken in to the care of the local authority. Whatever the reason, a child’s separation from their home and family signifies a disruption in their lives that has an impact on their emotional well-being. Most local authorities do not place children under five with foster carers who work outside the home; however, there are instances when this does occur or where the child has been placed with another family member who works. It is not appropriate for a looked after child who is under two years to be placed in a day care setting in addition to a foster placement.

We place emphasis on promoting children’s right to be strong, resilient and listened to. Our policy and practice guidelines for looked after children are based on two important concepts: attachment and resilience. The basis of this is to promote secure attachments in children’s lives, as the foundation for resilience. These aspects of well-being underpin the child’s responsiveness to learning and enable the development of positive dispositions for learning. For young children to get the most out of educational opportunities they need to be settled enough with their carer to be able to cope with further separation, a new environment and new expectations made upon them.

 

Principles

  • The term ‘looked after child’ denotes a child’s current legal status; this term is never used to categorise a child as standing out from others. We do not refer to such a child using acronyms such as LAC.
  • We do not normally offer placements for babies and children under two years who are in care; we offer instead other services to enable a child to play and engage with other children while their carer stays with them.
  • In exceptional circumstances, we offer places to two-year-old children who are in care. In such cases, the child should have been with the foster carer for at least two months and show signs of having formed a secure attachment to the carer, and the placement in the setting will last a minimum of three months.
  • we offer places for funded three and four-year-olds who are in care to ensure they receive their entitlement to early education. We expect that a child will have been with a foster carer for a minimum of one month and that they will have formed a secure attachment to the carer. We expect that the placement in the setting will last a minimum of six weeks.
  • we will always offer ‘stay and play’ provision for a child who is two to five years old who is still settling with their foster carer, or who is only temporarily being looked after.
  • Where a child who normally attends our setting is taken into care and is cared for by a local foster carer, we will continue to offer the placement for the child.

 

Procedures

  • The designated person for looked after children is the designated child protection co-ordinator.
  • Every child is allocated a key person before they start and this is no different for a looked after child. The designated person ensures the key person has the information, support and training necessary to meet the looked after child’s needs.
  • The designated person and the key person liaise with agencies, professionals and practitioners involved with the child and his or her family and ensure that appropriate information is gained and shared.
  • The setting recognises the role of the local authority children’s social care department as the child’s ‘corporate parent’ and the key agency in determining what takes place with the child. Nothing changes, especially with regard to the birth parent’s or foster carer’s role in relation to the setting, without prior discussion and agreement with the child’s social worker.
  • At the start of a placement there is a professional’s meeting to determine the objectives of the placement and draw up a care plan that incorporates the child’s learning needs. This plan is reviewed after two weeks, six weeks and three months. Thereafter at three to six monthly intervals.
  • The care plan needs to consider issues for the child such as:

–       their emotional needs and how they are to be met;

–       how any emotional issues and problems that affect behaviour are to be managed;

–       their sense of self, culture, language(s) and identity – and how this is to be supported;

–       their need for sociability and friendship;

–       their interests and abilities and possible learning journey pathway; and

–       how any special needs will be supported.

  • In addition the care plan will also consider:

–       how information will be shared with the foster carer and local authority (as the ‘corporate parent’) as well as what information is shared with whom and how it will be recorded and stored;

–       what contact the child has with his/her birth parent(s) and what arrangements will be in place for supervised contact. If this is to be at the setting, when, where and what form the contact will take will be discussed and agreed;

–       what written reporting is required;

–       wherever possible, and where the plan is for the child to return home, the birth parent(s) should be involved in planning; and

–       with the social worker’s agreement, and as part of the plan, the birth parent(s) should be involved in the setting’s activities that include parents, such as outings and fun-days etc alongside the foster carer.

  • The settling-in process for the child is agreed. It should be the same as for any other child, with the foster carer taking the place of the parent, unless otherwise agreed. It is even more important that the ‘proximity’ stage is followed until it is visible that the child has formed a sufficient relationship with his or her key person for them to act as a ‘secure base’ to allow the gradual separation from the foster carer. This process may take longer in some cases, so time needs to be allowed for it to take place without causing further distress or anxiety to the child.
  •  In the first two weeks after settling-in, the child’s well-being is the focus of observation, their sociability and their ability to manage their feelings with or without support.
  • Further observations about communication, interests and abilities will be noted to firm a picture of the whole child in relation to the Early Years Foundation Stage prime and specific areas of learning and development.
  • Concerns about the child will be noted in the child’s file and discussed with the foster carer.
  • If the concerns are about the foster carer’s treatment of the child, or if abuse is suspected, these are recorded in the child’s file and reported to the child’s social care worker according to the setting’s safeguarding children procedure.
  • Regular contact should be maintained with the social worker through planned meetings that will include the foster carer.
  • The transition to school will be handled sensitively. The designated person and/or the child’s key person will liaise with the school, passing on relevant information and documentation with the agreement of the looked after child’s birth parents.

 

1.4 Uncollected child

Policy statement

In the event that a child is not collected by an authorised adult by their expected collection time, We put into practice agreed procedures. The child will receive a high standard of care in order to cause as little distress as possible.

We inform parents/carers of Our procedures so that, if they are unavoidably delayed, they will be reassured that their children will be properly cared for.

Procedures

  • Parents are asked to provide the following specific information when their child starts attending Our setting, which is recorded on Our Registration Form:
  • Home address and telephone number – if the parents do not have a telephone, an alternative number must be given, perhaps a neighbour or close relative.
  • Place of work, address and telephone number (if applicable).
  • Mobile telephone number (if applicable).
  • Names, addresses, telephone numbers and signatures of adults who are authorised by the parents to collect their child from the setting, for example a childminder or grandparent.
  • Who has parental responsibility for the child.
  • Information about any person who does not have legal access to the child.
  • On occasions when parents are aware that they will not be at home or in their usual place of work, they inform us in writing of how they can be contacted.
  • On occasions when parents, or the persons normally authorised to collect the child, are not able to collect the child, they provide us with written details of the name, address and telephone number of the person who will be collecting their child. We agree with parents how to verify the identity of the person who is to collect their child.
  • Parents are informed that if they are not able to collect the child as planned, they must inform us so that We can begin to take back-up measures. Our contact telephone number is 01132 786 722 / 01132 30 40 35 
  • If a child is not collected at their expected collection time, We follow the procedures below:
  • The child’s file is checked for any information about changes to the normal collection routines.
  • If no information is available, parents/carers are contacted at home or at work.
  • If this is unsuccessful, the adults who are authorised by the parents to collect their child – and whose telephone numbers are recorded on the Registration Form – are contacted.
  • All reasonable attempts are made to contact the parents or nominated carers.
  • The child does not leave the premises with anyone other than those named on the Registration Form or in their file.
  • If no-one collects the child within 30 minutes of their expected collection time and there is no named contact who can be contacted to collect the child, We apply the procedures for uncollected children.
  • If we have any cause to believe the child has been abandoned We contact the local authority children’s social care team:
    If the children’s social care team is unavailable [or as our local authority advise] we will contact the local police]

0113 241 3459 – west yorkshire police – Weetwood police station

 
  • Or the out of hours duty officer:

0113 3760336  – Emergency out of hours team – 0113 2409536 

 
  • After an additional 15 minutes if the child has not been collected, we will contact the above statutory agencies again.
  • The child stays at the setting in: the care of two of our fully-vetted workers, one of whom will be our manager or deputy manager until the child is safely collected either by the parents or by a social care worker, or by another person specified by social care.
  • Social care will aim to find the parent or relative. If they are unable to do so, the child will become looked after by the local authority.
  • Under no circumstances will We go to look for the parent, nor leave the setting premises with the child.
  • We ensure that the child is not anxious and We do not discuss Our concerns in front of them.
  • A full written report of the incident is recorded in the child’s file.
  • Depending on circumstances, We reserve the right to charge parents for the additional hours worked.
  • Ofsted may be informed:

0300 123 1231

(telephone number)

 

1.5 Missing child

Policy statement

Children’s safety is our  highest priority, both on and off the premises. Every attempt is made, through the implementation of our  outings procedure and our exit/entrance procedure, to ensure the security of children is maintained at all times. In the unlikely event of a child going missing,our  missing child procedure is followed.

Procedures

Child going missing on the premises

  • As soon as it is noticed that a child is missing, the child’s key person/ member of staff alerts our setting manager.
  • The register is checked to make sure no other child has also gone astray.
  • our site Manager will carry out a thorough search of the building and garden. 
  • Doors and gates are checked to see if there has been a breach of security whereby a child could wander out.
  • If the child is not found, our Manager calls the police immediately and reports the child as missing. If it is suspected that the child may have been abducted, the police are informed of this.
  • The parent(s) are then called and informed.
  • A recent photo and a note of what the child is wearing is given to the police. 
  • our Site Manager talks to our staff to find out when and where the child was last seen and records this.
  • our Site Manager contacts our chair the Charity Manager and reports the incident. Our Chair or Charity Director comes to the provision immediately to carry out an investigation with our management team where appropriate. 

Child going missing on an outing

This describes what to do when our staff have taken a small group on an outing, leaving our manager and/or other staff back in our setting premises. If our manager has accompanied children on the outing childminder, the procedures are adjusted accordingly. What to do when a child goes missing from a whole group outing may be a little different, as parents usually attend and are responsible for their own child.  

  • As soon as it is noticed that a child is missing, the staff members on the outing ask children to stand with their designated carer and carry out a headcount to ensure that no other child has gone astray. 
  • One staff member searches the immediate vicinity, but does not search beyond that.
  • Our senior staff member on the outing contacts the police and reports that child as missing.
  • Our manager is contacted immediately (if not on the outing) and the incident is recorded.
  • Our manager contacts the parent(s).
  • Our staff take the remaining children back to the setting as soon as possible.
  • According to the advice of the police, a senior member of staff, or our manager where applicable, should remain at the site where the child went missing and wait for the police to arrive. 
  • A recent photo and a description of what the child is wearing is given to the police.
  • Our manager contacts our chair and director and reports the incident. Our chair/ director comes to our premises immediately to carry out an investigation, [with our management team (where appropriate).
  • Our staff keep calm and do not let the other children become anxious or worried.

The investigation

  • Ofsted are informed as soon as possible and kept up-to-date with the investigation.
  • Our Chair and/ or Director, carries out a full investigation, taking written statements from all our staff and volunteers who were present.
  • Our manager, together with Chair and/ or Director, speaks with the parent(s) and explains the process of the investigation.
  • The parent(s) may also raise a complaint with us or Ofsted.
  • Each member of staff present writes an incident report detailing:
  • The date and time of the incident.
  • Where the child went missing from e.g. the setting or an outing venue.
  • Which staff/children were in the premises/on the outing and the name of the staff member who was designated as responsible for the missing child.
  • When the child was last seen in the premises/or on the outing, including the time it is estimated that the child went missing.
  • What has taken place in the premises or on the outing since the child went missing.
  • The report is counter-signed by the senior member of staff and the date and time added.
  • A conclusion is drawn as to how the breach of security happened.
  • If the incident warrants a police investigation, all our staff co-operate fully. In this case, the police will handle all aspects of the investigation, including interviewing staff and parents. Children’s social care may be involved if it seems likely that there is a child protection issue to address.
  • In the event of disciplinary action needing to be taken, Ofsted are advised.
  • The insurance provider is informed.

Managing people

  • Missing child incidents are very worrying for all concerned. Part of managing the incident is to try to keep everyone as calm as possible.
  • Our staff will feel worried about the child, especially the key person or the designated carer responsible for the safety of that child for the outing. They may blame themselves and their feelings of anxiety and distress will rise as the length of time the child is missing increases.
  • They may be the understandable target of parental anger and they may be afraid. Our manager ensures that any staff under investigation are not only fairly treated, but receive support while feeling vulnerable.
  • The parents will feel angry, and fraught. They may want to blame our staff and may single out one staff member over others; they may direct their anger at our manager. When dealing with a distraught and angry parent, there should always be two members of staff one of whom is our manager and the other should be our Chair and/ or Director,. No matter how understandable the parent’s anger may be, aggression or threats against our staff are not tolerated, and the police should be called.
  • The other children are also sensitive to what is going on around them. They too may be worried. Our remaining staff caring for them need to be focused on their needs and must not discuss the incident in front of them. They should answer children’s questions honestly, but also reassure them.
  • In accordance with the severity of the final outcome, our staff may need counselling and support. If a child is not found, or is injured, or worse, this will be a very difficult time. Our [chair, director or owner] will use their discretion to decide what action to take.
  • Our staff must not discuss any missing child incident with the press without taking advice.

 

1.6 Online safety (inc. mobile phones and cameras)

Policy statement

We take steps to ensure that there are effective procedures in place to protect children, young people and vulnerable adults from the unacceptable use of Information Communication Technology (ICT) equipment or exposure to inappropriate materials in the setting. 

Procedures

  • Our designated person responsible for co-ordinating action taken to protect children is:

Clare Bligh / Ellen McCartney

Information Communication Technology (ICT) equipment

  • Only ICT equipment belonging to the setting is used by staff and children.
  • The designated person is responsible for ensuring all ICT equipment is safe and fit for purpose. 
  • All computers have virus protection installed.
  • The designated person ensures that safety settings are set to ensure that inappropriate material cannot be accessed.

Internet access

  • Children do not normally have access to the internet and never have unsupervised access.
  • If staff access the internet with children for the purposes of promoting their learning, written permission is gained from parents who are shown this policy.
  • The designated person has overall responsibility for ensuring that children and young people are safeguarded and risk assessments in relation to online safety are completed.
  • Children are taught the following stay safe principles in an age appropriate way prior to using the internet;
  • only go on line with a grown up
  • be kind on line
  • keep information about me safely
  • only press buttons on the internet to things I understand
  • tell a grown up if something makes me unhappy on the internet
  • Designated persons will also seek to build children’s resilience in relation to issues they may face in the online world, and will address issues such as staying safe, having appropriate friendships, asking for help if unsure, not keeping secrets as part of social and emotional development in age appropriate ways.
  • If a second hand computer is purchased or donated to the setting, the designated person will ensure that no inappropriate material is stored on it before children use it.
  • All computers for use by children are located in an area clearly visible to staff.
  • Children are not allowed to access social networking sites.
  • Staff report any suspicious or offensive material, including material which may incite racism, bullying or discrimination to the Internet Watch Foundation at www.iwf.org.uk.
  • Suspicions that an adult is attempting to make inappropriate contact with a child on-line is reported to the National Crime Agency’s Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre at www.ceop.police.uk.
  • The designated person ensures staff have access to age-appropriate resources to enable them to assist children to use the internet safely.
  • If staff become aware that a child is the victim of cyber-bullying, they discuss this with their parents and refer them to sources of help, such as the NSPCC on 0808 800 5000 or www.nspcc.org.uk, or Childline on 0800 1111 or www.childline.org.uk.

Email

  • Children are not permitted to use email in the setting. Parents and staff are not normally permitted to use setting equipment to access personal emails.
  • Staff do not access personal or work email whilst supervising children.
  • Staff send personal information by encrypted email and share information securely at all times.

Mobile phones – children

  • Children do not bring mobile phones or other ICT devices with them to the setting. If a child is found to have a mobile phone or ICT device with them, this is removed and stored in [lockers or a locked drawer] until the parent collects them at the end of the session.

Mobile phones – staff and visitors

  • Personal mobile phones are not used by Our staff on the premises during working hours. They will be stored in [lockers or a locked drawer].
  • In an emergency, personal mobile phones may be used in an area where there are no children present, with permission from the manager.
  • Our staff and volunteers ensure that the setting telephone number is known to family and other people who may need to contact them in an emergency.
  • If Our members of staff or volunteers take their mobile phones on outings, for use in case of an emergency, they must not make or receive personal calls, or take photographs of children.
  • Parents and visitors are requested not to use their mobile phones whilst on the premises. We make an exception if a visitor’s company or organisation operates a lone working policy that requires contact with their office periodically throughout the day. Visitors will be advised of a quiet space where they can use their mobile phone, where no children are present.
  • These rules also apply to the use of work-issued mobiles, and when visiting or supporting staff in other settings.

Cameras and videos

  • Our staff and volunteers must not bring their personal cameras or video recording equipment into the setting.
  • Photographs and recordings of children are only taken for valid reasons i.e. to record their learning and development, or for displays within the setting, with written permission received by parents (see the Registration form). Such use is monitored by the manager.
  • Where parents request permission to photograph or record their own children at special events, general permission is gained from all parents for their children to be included. Parents are advised that they do not have a right to photograph anyone else’s child or to upload photos of anyone else’s children.
  • If photographs of children are used for publicity purposes, parental consent must be given and safeguarding risks minimised, for example, ensuring children cannot be identified by name or through being photographed in a sweatshirt with the name of their setting on it.

Social media 

  • Staff are advised to manage their personal security settings to ensure that their information is only available to people they choose to share information with.
  • Staff should not accept service users, children and parents as friends due to it being a breach of expected professional conduct. 
  • In the event that staff name the organisation or workplace in any social media they do so in a way that is not detrimental to the organisation or its service users. 
  • Staff observe confidentiality and refrain from discussing any issues relating to work
  • Staff should not share information they would not want children, parents or colleagues to view. 
  • Staff should report any concerns or breaches to the designated person in their setting. 
  • Staff avoid personal communication, including on social networking sites, with the children and parents with whom they act in a professional capacity. If a practitioner and family are friendly prior to the child coming into the setting, this information is shared with the manager prior to a child attending and a risk assessment and agreement in relation to boundaries is agreed. 

Electronic learning journals for recording children’s progress

  • Managers seek permission from the senior management team prior to using any online learning journal. A risk assessment is completed with details on how the learning journal is managed to ensure children are safeguarded.
  • Staff adhere to the guidance provided with the system at all times.

Use and/or distribution of inappropriate images

  • Staff are aware that it is an offence to distribute indecent images. In the event of a concern that a colleague or other person is behaving inappropriately, the Safeguarding Children and Child Protection policy, in relation to allegations against staff and/or responding to suspicions of abuse, is followed 
  • Staff are aware that grooming children and young people on line is an offence in its own right and concerns about a colleague’s or others’ behaviour are reported (as above).

Further guidance

  • NSPCC and CEOP Keeping Children Safe Online training: www.nspcc.org.uk/what-you-can-do/get-expert-training/keeping-children-safe-online-course/

This policy was adopted by

 

(name of provider)

On

 

(date)

Date to be reviewed

 

(date)

Signed on behalf of the provider

 

Name of signatory

 

Role of signatory (e.g. chair, director or owner)

 

Other useful Pre-school Learning Alliance publications

Safeguarding Children (2013)

Employee Handbook (2012)